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The Hunger Games: Lessons learned

The Hunger Games: Lessons learned

My 13-year-old son read all of the books in “The Hunger Games” series. On opening day, my 10-year-old daughter went to see the movie with her friend by themselves (well, with other parents sitting in the back). The next day, our entire family went to see it with three other relatives. We bought a souvenir cup at the movie theatre weeks before the premiere. I read about the controversy that was caused when a private screening was shown to the media, and someone Tweeted out too many details about the storyline. There are 56 million references to the topic when performing a Google search. When I was taking out the trash the other evening, my neighbor approached me and asked if I saw it. We entered into a 45-minute conversation about society, values and raising children. There are universities using the movie for discussion in English classes to critique and analyze the author’s messages.

The movie itself is controversial, and many question the intent to direct its appeal to children with a PG-13 rating. What is has been able to do is set records for revenue earned in the first weekend (US$155 million, twice what “Twilight” earned).

Everyone is talking about the movie for various reasons. 

Is everyone talking about your product or service?  In 2008, a hotel company came up with the slogan, “@*% the Recession.” I wonder if it caused enough awareness or support to increase its revenue.

Is your company being controversial or innovative? Does your weekend promotion feature complimentary HBO, local phone calls and fitness center access when all of these things are included anyway? Could it offer something unique, like VIP passes to a new art exhibit in your area, complete with a signed original print? Could you offer free soccer balls for each paid room to a soccer team that is in need of some new equipment?

MPD (Most People Don’t) think creatively to encourage buzz and stimulate awareness. You can separate yourself from others with original thinking to promote your product.

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