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Back-of-house at the forefront

Each year, HOTELS writes a story about kitchen design, and these days, a common theme among those stories is emerging: kitchens are becoming increasingly open to guests, and their design must be adjusted accordingly.

Take Rose. Rabbit. Lie. at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas. This new outlet aims to blur the lines between theater, club, restaurant and bar to offer guests a distinctive experience. Its 2,324-sq-ft (216-sq-m) kitchen needs to handle a wide range of menu items, from raw-bar selections to flatbreads to large roasts, which demanded efficiency in design. Food and beverage partner Coastal Luxury Management worked with Chef Levi Mezic to create features such as a double production line built for speed, with the expeditor in the center and two lines on either side. The team also wanted to maximize overall space for cooking, so a loft was built for dry storage.

The 2,324-sq-ft (216-sq-m) kitchen at Rose. Rabbit. Lie. at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas needs to handle a wide range of menu items, from raw-bar selections to flatbreads to large roasts.
The 2,324-sq-ft (216-sq-m) kitchen at Rose. Rabbit. Lie. at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas needs to handle a wide range of menu items, from raw-bar selections to flatbreads to large roasts.

Still, what interested me most was what Rob Weakley of Coastal Luxury Management predicts about the future of hotel kitchen design. “I think we’ll see an emphasis on bringing what is important in the front-of-house to the back-of-house,” Weakley says. “For example, making kitchens more attractive and into spaces that become part of the overall experience. Guests have become more and more interested in kitchens and often ask to tour them, so I feel it’s important to make sure they match the dining room’s aesthetic when it comes to design, efficiency and attention to detail.”

What do you think? Are the kitchens at your hotel bringing the back-of-house to the forefront, and in what ways?

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